What to See & Do

Uniacke Estate bedroom
 

Pass through the gated entrance of Uniacke Estate Museum Park and experience part of Nova Scotia’s history. Surrounded by towering old growth trees, the tranquil lane you’re traveling on winds its way along the historic Halifax-to-Windsor stage coach route - the province’s first highway.

Here along the peaceful shores of Lake Martha, Richard John Uniacke, Nova Scotia’s Attorney General, built an elegant country estate, a prominent testimony to his accomplishments and prosperity.

Enter the doors of the grand old house and discover a place untouched by time, containing original family furnishings, portraits and personal belongings, set out as they were when Richard John lived there. Eight interpretive nature trails will help you explore the sprawling 930-hectare estate with its rich natural heritage, historic archeological sites and splendid forests and vistas.

After viewing the house at Uniacke Estate, spend some time exploring one or more of the seven outstanding hiking trails available on this 930-hectare property. You can discover Nova Scotia's rich natural heritage in all seasons.

To discover even more heritage in the area, take in the scenic rural route to Windsor, on Highway #1, the first highway in the province. Upon arriving in Windsor, follow the key symbol to two other historic houses, that are part of the Nova Scotia Museum family.

Stop in Windsor at Haliburton House, or "Clifton," as it was originally named. This stately home, set on a spectacular hilltop property with lovely grounds, was the former home of Judge Thomas Chandler Haliburton, author of the popular Sam Slick stories. In his day, Haliburton was as internationally renowned as Mark Twain. His Sam Slick character was famous the world over and made popular the sayings "it's raining cats and dogs," "quick as a wink," and "facts are stranger than fiction."

Also in Windsor, stop in at Shand House Museum, an ornate late-Victorian house once owned by a prominent family in old Windsor. The house still displays many of the Shand family’s belongings. Built in 1890-91, this old house was once considered ultra-modern, featuring central heating, closets, electric lighting and indoor plumbing. Visitors will especially enjoy an ascent to the tower to take in a panoramic view of the Windsor area.